Penn 49A History.

BTTB

Senior Member
Serra Moz wrote:
Are there any pics available of these masters fishing of the ledges? Sorry, I know it's a side track to the 49's history, but I would love to see some pics!
One picture in particular I saw on this forum was of the late Karl/Charles Vegal (unsure of the spelling) dressed in what looks like a Butcher's apron casting his rod, most probably from Vegal's point which was aptly named after him. A big tough German guy who didn't take any nonsense from anybody, it is said he chased other fisherman from standing on his spot. The apron was needed for the line they used at the time which carried water.

kraken wrote:
Thanx BTTB for filling in the gaps.

There is a story that Louis Boshoff was pulled off the ledges by a big thing due to having locked his drag....

This is a place steeped in history and was apparently fished long before a road had been made past Simonstown.
That story is true in regards to Louis Boshoff.
According to divers there is a deep cave below Louis Boshoff's fishing spot and it was conjectured that on this day a Yellowfin may have come from an unlikely angle and taken him off guard as he apparently hurt his ankles from the force of the fish hitting him and not having any drag or means of even loosening it.

From what I understand the first fish that were caught at Rooikrantz was circa 1906 and the fish in question was Red Steenbras. Amazing, now you are lucky to catch a barely size Red Roman.
 

Joker

Senior Member
Just some pics I took out the book, "Game fishing Transformed" Charles Horne.

Hope I did not infringe on copyright issues.

Pic was taken on March 15, 1951
 

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Joker

Senior Member
Pic also taken from the same book.

Pic was taken at Rooikrantz after a fight that lasted for two hours.

Angler : Jack Wheeler
 

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Joker

Senior Member
Pic from the same book.

Women also caught tunny at Rooikrantz.

Mrs Vi Knipe and Mrs Joan Ritchie.
 

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BTTB

Senior Member
The Oceans 50 Club formed in 1970 and still going could be a wealth of information.
Their contact details are 021-7611599.
Some of their founding and life members are still alive like Ralph Wilkinson, who holds a record for a  large Yellowfin caught at Rooikrantz.

Back: E.Smith,J.Thain,D.Smith,N.Scott,C.Bleekers,C.Manwaring,W.Tait,D.Bain
Front: J.Coupe,R.Wilkinson,G.Boshoff(Captain),R.Banister
 

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BTTB

Senior Member
Alfie Boshoff's (Brother to Louis) cottage at Franskraal, picture taken two weekends ago. It is possible the old cottage is still in the family, somebody is maintaining it.
Members of the Oceans 50 Club utilised it back in the day.
 

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Those of you that take Reels to Keith Murison should ask him about these stories and reels when next you are there. He has a wealth of knowledge about it as these gentlemen all worked with his father at the railways back in the day and they were all in some way or the other involved in the modification of all sorts of reels. I'm sure he could fill many of the gaps.
 

tobyshark

Member
Hi Ed,

I have dug out an old Instruction Manual and repair Parts List for 1976.But i see they don't mention the 49A .They do mention the 49 and the 49m.(See attached)

I grew up in Durban and it took a long time for the 49A to usurp the wooden scarborough but once established it was recognised as the 4x4 of multiplying reels.In fact all multiplyers were refered to as Penn's irrespective of brand.I remember the old timers casting out shad (bluefish) for livebait.These bluefish could weigh anything up to a kilo

The jigmaster 500 was also a very popular model.The 49A was used for heavy tackle and the jigmaster for light tackle. Would you like me to post this manual to you ?

Best regards

Simon

 

 

 
 

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Spinnerman

New member
Just came upon this thread and will add a few comments.

I've had the privilege to fish with some of the names mentioned in this thread through the 60's and 70's and I can confirm many of the stories as true and correct, though by word of mouth, but also often from the people themselves.

As to the legendary Penn 49 and 49A, it was really very simple, if you did not have one you did not fish for Yellowtail. They were the only reels with perhaps the British Tatler being the exception.

Not many of the guys from those days are still around, and indeed Steve Champion is a good source, a filter and patience will be essential. Some of the stories have been told so many times when there were no fish around that they have become a bit worn around the edges and stretched at times. Steve is the undoubted expert of the Spinner.

Ashley Reed also fished at Rooikrans and in fact was seen there some years back, still flogging the water with a large Tatler reel.

Mike Stott was most certainly deeply involved in tackle, and a variety of sport and related activities of which Shooting, Fishing, body building comes to mind. A man of many attributes and a pioneer of much of the Yellowtail fishing around Cape Point. Also Policansky reels were attributed to him and he still fished one shortly before he eventually passed away. The last time he came to Rooikrans I saw him make his way back up, very very slowly, with great determination. I have not ever heard his name associated with Penn in the manner suggested here, but that he fished with those reels is for certain and it is very likely that he did provide input.

The influence of the S A Railways could often be seen. Louis Boshof lived in Fish Hoek at the time I got to know him. He liked to make spinners, and various other Rooikrans fishing related stuff. Till his last days he fished at the spot that is named after him.
He did fall, or got dragged off his perch which I believe was down the lower section from where the old bench was, down Veagle, on to the low water ledge as far as I know and was also fairly seriously injured, but recovered to fish again. Perhaps it is not commonly known but the much favoured "keel" spinner, of which there are a few variants, has it's origins from Louis Boshof. The first prototypes had two "keels" one on either side and it was completely straight.

It is also true that many fished with locked drags those days.

There are still a fair number of pictures and even video available from "those days" but those that have it are loath to make it available. The reasons are probably no longer valid.
 

Seeker1

Senior Member
My Oldman (centre) and some friends with yellowtail landed at Rooikrantz in the late 1940's on Penn 49's
 

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Seeker1

Senior Member
Me with a yellowtail landed at Sunny Cove in the early 1960's also with a Penn 49 and indian cane rod. Spinner I used that day was a Boshoff spinner designed by the gentleman mentioned earlier.
 

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gavross22

New member
Hi all, I have just been given a Penn 49 by my Dad, in mint condition complete with the original box, price tag (R219.95) and instruction manual. It apparently lived behind his pub for 30 odd years so I am flabbergasted that the paperwork doesn't have any beer stains on it. An interesting point however is that the box is branded as a Penn 49A but the reel only says Penn 49. Maybe someone can shed some light on that for me.
 

Arniston

New member
Yes it was Mike Stott...I remember him well...a congenial personality...I met him once when I dated his daughter Renee way back in the mid seventies...his wife was involved with the Black Sash...I think she was a Councillor in Cape Town and yes he was a director of Lemkus.

If I'm not mistaken he was a Springbok Big Game fisherman as well...Mr Stott was a real gentleman...a thoroughbred fisherman who not only nailed the tail at Rooikranz (and he had another precarious spot further on towards the point...Pegrams Bay, I think it was called...or something like that...such a long time ago but he still continued to fish there when, I believe in his seventies...the spot alone would be a task in itself to reach,let alone cast, hook and land a 'tail...even youngsters would shy of this place.

Mike was amazing too in that he fished for everything and in different catergories. He was equally at home flycasting for trout and bass in the streams and dams of the Western Cape.

He reminded me a bit of the late Charles Norman...not only an all-rounder but a master of all forms of fishing.

 
 

jb2

Sealiner
Arniston wrote:
Yes it was Mike Stott...I remember him well...a congenial personality...I met him once when I dated his daughter Renee way back in the mid seventies...his wife was involved with the Black Sash...I think she was a Councillor in Cape Town and yes he was a director of Lemkus.

If I'm not mistaken he was a Springbok Big Game fisherman as well...Mr Stott was a real gentleman...a thoroughbred fisherman who not only nailed the tail at Rooikranz (and he had another precarious spot further on towards the point...Pegrams Bay, I think it was called...or something like that...such a long time ago but he still continued to fish there when, I believe in his seventies...the spot alone would be a task in itself to reach,let alone cast, hook and land a 'tail...even youngsters would shy of this place.

Mike was amazing too in that he fished for everything and in different catergories. He was equally at home flycasting for trout and bass in the streams and dams of the Western Cape.

He reminded me a bit of the late Charles Norman...not only an all-rounder but a master of all forms of fishing.

 

Hi Arniston

It is always great to hear of the pioneers of the game.

Could the exposed rock have been Penguin Rock?

I have never been down there myself but it is under the lighthouse and it is a trick descent along a rocky ledge.

There is another spot between Penguin and Rooikrantz called Platbank. I have shot yellowtail there and it would have been fishable in the days of hot water before the kelp grew thick in the bay.

It is below the current restaurant.
 

Arniston

New member
I was wrong...Pegrams Bay is somewhere else...I think on the Atlantic side...a galjeon spot in my day...getting my wires crossed.

Yes, it was near the lighthouse but it was not called Penguin Rock or Platbank...at least not in those days...I've seen a picture of Mike Stott fishing there in his late sixties or early seventies...he caught yellowtail there. It was very steep and the ledge was narrow.

I never fished there myself and come to think of it it could have been on the other side of the light house...near Diaz Beach? Was a long time ago and I now live in KZN and haven't visited that part for years. Also used to spearfish in that area and era but from skiboat.

That spot is mentioned in the book "Strike" by Schoeman.

Mr Stott was a user of the Penn 49 and A...well that was the reel in those days.
 

BTTB

Senior Member
Probably Maclear, seen here at the end of Dias beach. One chap I was chatting to last week said his wife banned him from fishing this venue as it is quite treacherous, only space for one or two people to fish and you need a rope gaff.

I personally will not fish here.
 

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Arniston

New member
Yes, I think you are spot on. Cape Maclear does ring a bell. A very precarious spot...Mike Stott had fitness that was unbelievable...he used to do this as an old man on his own and catch and land with a rope gaff...not only that to ascend carrying the fish...absolutely incredible...I don't there are many young men that could or would do that today.
 
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