What goes into a resin bodied lure

This is one of my little sprat size lures, originally nicknamed a jelly baby because the first one was small and translucent. Here is the various stages of progress. A lot of work goes into them. Generally designed with a specific fishing technique and action in mind, unlike commercial lures.

This one has evolved slightly from the original. I've made it a faster bait with a great wobble on the sink.
 

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Ned-Kelly

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benniejordaan wrote:
This is one of my little sprat size lures, originally nicknamed a jelly baby because the first one was small and translucent. Here is the various stages of progress. A lot of work goes into them. Generally designed with a specific fishing technique and action in mind, unlike commercial lures.

This one has evolved slightly from the original. I've made it a faster bait with a great wobble on the sink.


Bennie,

Must give credit where credit is due......
Your lures look proper!
Really envious of your craftsmanship....

Hope they put many fish on your deck.
 
willem wikkel spies wrote:
the trick here is to put the ballast in the right place!!!

Absolutely. But that correct place also depends on what you want the lure to do. This lure is a medium action lure, so the weight is fairly central to the body with foam directly balancing it. If you want a faster lure, move it back, which numbs the action a bit. Move it forward and the lure becomes more lively requiring less speed to work it. Raise some weight and it causes some roll if you want to reflect light downward. But the buoyancy is just as important as the lead insert.

That is the beauty of making your own lures. You make it for your environment and technique.
 
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