Amount of line on reel needed for shark fishing

Washburn

Member
Good day all, I have read the various post dating from 2014 regarding putting 300m 50lbs braid backing and filling the rest of the reel up with .5 or .55 mono on toriums or daiwa's.

But what is the minimum amount of line needed on a grinder for day to day shark fishing in the Cape? Eg casting bait out and not droning. Will 500m of 50lbs braid be enough? Considering that one would rarely be wading...
 

Marthin

Sealiner
I don't know about grinders. I know they have quite a bit of drag. I landed a 100 and bit kg bronzie on a speedmaster years ago. It had roughly 300m of the very first braids available, wound on so tight you couldnt do more than about 30m before taking a rest and .50 mono on top. About 600m. I saw the pin twice during the fight, and it took close to 2 hours for me to land the thing, my first and only Bronzie... After that left that to the pros in the red jackets.

I wouldnt suggest anything under 600m regardless of what you are using. There are some tanks swimming about, but there are guys doing this all the time that can give you much better advice.
 

Washburn

Member
@
cant seem to edit my post, speedmaster had about 600m total line on it.
Noted thank you. I did some research and noted that the grinders of today can handle 40 to 50lbs worth of drag easy and that they Torium 30 or 20/40's could only handle 25-30lbs. I thus assume that you can stop a fish in double the time if you apply double the drag. Does this make sense?

Further, I would rather skip targetink sharks with anything less than 600m as it makes sense to me that monsters migth spool you as WWS stated.
 

dewalds

Member
Many may differ from my view, but I always tackle up for that "one" fish... so i end up fishing with the heaviest tackle i can manage in the circumstances.

I have received my fair share of hidings and while it is interesting stories to share, it is much better to share the story of a special fish landed as opposed to the monster that was lost.

Regardless of the area I fish, the moment I target any shark, I will not fish with less than 800m of line, and most definitely nothing below 50lb kit. If I am able to fish heavier tackle in the circumstances I will most definitely do so.
 

DJP

Sealiner
You should be targeting smaller sharks first before targeting bronzies. I.e. learn to catch hounds and spotted gulley sharks first. For this a reel with 300m of 50lb should be fine (maybe up the lb to 60-70 if there is rocks nearby). If you are targeting larger sharks you really don't know if you will hook a 50 or 150kg shark, and some days they are just more wild than others and the currents etc. make life difficult, so as Dewalds said buy a big grinder load it with 800m plus braid of at least 50lb. There is no minimum amount since you may still get smoked on heavy tackle but other days you may turn the shark quicker. 40 to 50lbs drag is fine but you will tire sooner than the shark with that drag and thus the need for capacity. Also if you put too much pressure on a bronzie from the beginning it will tend to jump and or wrap, many fish have been lost this way. For a novice I would say rather up the lb than the capacity because drifting kelp is an issue to deal with as is dealing with the shark when it comes in and the increased lb will help offset those mistakes we all made when starting to target bigger sharks. Make sure your terminal tackle is impeccable, use quality hooks, steel, swivel and leader, test all you knots properly.
What the old articles don't always mention is that the mono and thick wind on leaders had more drag which tires the sharks a bit quicker and puts less strain on the angler (well that was the experience with the transition to grinders and braid). We also used broomstick for rods and you would brake with your thumb on the spool if the shark ran too far... tight lines!
 

Washburn

Member
You should be targeting smaller sharks first before targeting bronzies. I.e. learn to catch hounds and spotted gulley sharks first. For this a reel with 300m of 50lb should be fine (maybe up the lb to 60-70 if there is rocks nearby). If you are targeting larger sharks you really don't know if you will hook a 50 or 150kg shark, and some days they are just more wild than others and the currents etc. make life difficult, so as Dewalds said buy a big grinder load it with 800m plus braid of at least 50lb. There is no minimum amount since you may still get smoked on heavy tackle but other days you may turn the shark quicker. 40 to 50lbs drag is fine but you will tire sooner than the shark with that drag and thus the need for capacity. Also if you put too much pressure on a bronzie from the beginning it will tend to jump and or wrap, many fish have been lost this way. For a novice I would say rather up the lb than the capacity because drifting kelp is an issue to deal with as is dealing with the shark when it comes in and the increased lb will help offset those mistakes we all made when starting to target bigger sharks. Make sure your terminal tackle is impeccable, use quality hooks, steel, swivel and leader, test all you knots properly.
What the old articles don't always mention is that the mono and thick wind on leaders had more drag which tires the sharks a bit quicker and puts less strain on the angler (well that was the experience with the transition to grinders and braid). We also used broomstick for rods and you would brake with your thumb on the spool if the shark ran too far... tight lines!
Hi @DJP, thank you for the info and advice. Noted and agreed. So the best way to target the hounds and gully's or smaller sharks in general would be to stick to smaller baits and smaller hooks..e.g not chucking or sliding out a massive bonnie head?
 

dewalds

Member
Having read the subsequent developments and not realizing that Washburn is new to the facet of shark angling, I will echo DJP's view.

If you are new to the sport it is always best to start off small with the smaller species and gradually work your way up from there.

If you do not have experience in catching any form of shark as yet I would urge you not to put a huge bait out and fish areas notorious for smaller shark species, such as hounds and spotted gulleys to first master the basics not only in playing and landing the fish but also to ensure a safe and speedy release.

PS... please post a pic once you have secured your first success!
 

Washburn

Member
Having read the subsequent developments and not realizing that Washburn is new to the facet of shark angling, I will echo DJP's view.

If you are new to the sport it is always best to start off small with the smaller species and gradually work your way up from there.

If you do not have experience in catching any form of shark as yet I would urge you not to put a huge bait out and fish areas notorious for smaller shark species, such as hounds and spotted gulleys to first master the basics not only in playing and landing the fish but also to ensure a safe and speedy release.

PS... please post a pic once you have secured your first success!
Thank you for the advice. I will hit up youtube and revert back with pics!
 

Spool-Song

Sealiner
All good advice. You will be surprised how often you get smoked by gully sharks and hounds around the bricks. You will very quickly discover what knots work and what tackle to use. Broken swivels, straightened hooks, chafed leaders, all part of the school fees.
 
LOL I mean, I've pulled fish...but I've hooked gully sharks in the tsitsikamma, there's a resident monster in Eerste River among the reefs, that are not mean't to be landed..LOL..I've had my exage 110H feel like a piece of pap bamboo and been knitted up so bad in the rocks by that guy pulling locked drag me burning my thumb trying to stop him and it goes where it wants..Yeah gully sharks and smoothhounds will give you a good rev anyway and test you, definitely get you ready for any bigger stuff and occasionally drill you harder than the bigger stuff in among the bricks.
 
Can't seem to edit in the new forum software, but...yeah, you hook a 30kg plus Spotted Gully Shark, they get up to 50 kg...but you hook one of those big ones and you will know all about it..They pull like anything..You will swear you hooked a dogtooth tuna between the bricks hahahah and they fight dirty like a yellowtail when there's reef around. The only thing that have been as unstoppable as those big spotties that I've hooked have been a giant yellowtail, marlin or big 100kg plus tuna LOL..
 

Washburn

Member
Having read the subsequent developments and not realizing that Washburn is new to the facet of shark angling, I will echo DJP's view.

If you are new to the sport it is always best to start off small with the smaller species and gradually work your way up from there.

If you do not have experience in catching any form of shark as yet I would urge you not to put a huge bait out and fish areas notorious for smaller shark species, such as hounds and spotted gulleys to first master the basics not only in playing and landing the fish but also to ensure a safe and speedy release.

PS... please post a pic once you have secured your first success!
Good day all, attached a pic as promised. I decided I was undergunned for sharks and targeted edibles..got this one on the last evening before returning home. Thank you for the advice!
 

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