SEALINE - South African Angling and Boating Community Home 
Home Recent Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register


 Moderated by: Enigma, Emperor Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2   
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
Dangerous Situations  Rate Topic 
 
AuthorPost
 Posted: Thu Jul 10th, 2008 12:48 pm
  PM Quote Reply
21st Post
gumboots
Member


Joined: Mon Jun 30th, 2008
Location: Cape Town, Tableview, South Africa
Posts: 81
Equipment: still equiping.
Best Catch: Galjoen
Favorite Fishing Spot: Anyware on West Coast
Boat: rubberduck, 2 x 60hp
Club: 
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
Great post Hendre. It is important to stay calm but also important to at least knowing what to do when something happens. Calmness only lasts soooo long.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Thu Jul 10th, 2008 12:50 pm
  PM Quote Reply
22nd Post
Hendre
Senior Member


Joined: Mon Dec 31st, 2007
Location: Durbanville, Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 274
Equipment: AFAW Rods, Shimano Trini 30, Finnor
Best Catch: 48kg Bronzie;Galjoen: 1.6kg;Yellowtail, 4kg; Trout, 2kg
Favorite Fishing Spot: Hermanus Walker Bay, Hemel en Aarde Valley, Macassar
Boat: Croc 2 seater
Club: WP536
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
Thanks guys!

I didn't forget about doing the other posts. Just a bit busy at work at the moment. Will hopefully be up early next week.

Cheers!

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Thu Jul 10th, 2008 01:10 pm
  PM Quote Reply
23rd Post
Marthin
Sealine Team - W-Cape


Joined: Wed Jul 9th, 2008
Location: Cape Town, Durbanville, South Africa
Posts: 13481
Equipment: BM G3, Seagrand II, Others, Shimano reels
Best Catch: 17kg Cracker, 11.8kg Cracker, 8kg Cracker, 7kg Steenie
Favorite Fishing Spot: Gouritzmond
Boat: None
Club: 
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
I can only add this from personal experience. You might very well see the blue wall standing up in front of you and making a "bakkop" like a cobra. You have a split second to react. Don't start running. Look for a rock that might break some of the force of the water, act as a shield between you and the water and dive in behind it, no matter how smal, as long as it is lodged firmly. Most guys dont make it because that 1st wave picks them up and smacks them against the rocks, leaving them either dead/unconscious/dizzy or disorientated. Hendre's best advice is to not try and swim for the side as soon as you hit the water.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Thu Jul 10th, 2008 05:18 pm
  PM Quote Reply
24th Post
ignoblis
Senior Member


Joined: Mon May 21st, 2007
Location: Durban, South Africa
Posts: 471
Equipment: Exeller Rods 7" and 9' XXH; Shimano Aerocast 30XH - ...
Best Catch: 1.2Kg Ignoblis, 3Kg Shad, 5Kg Natal Snoek
Favorite Fishing Spot: Sheffield Beach, Umgeni River Mouth, Beechwood
Boat: One Day
Club: 
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
Guys

I have also heaps of life saving experience and one more thing that could be added is should you be getting washed over a shallow or near dry rock shelf, one can get over by totally relaxing your body and protecting your head as the wave washes you over and not not trying to fight the current. This is if you haven't been able to stand up and dive over. When you fight he current you tend to get smahed up on the rocks where as if you relax you can literally float in millimetres of water. I have had to do this many times surfing over shallow coral reefs in Indonesia and Fiji where the reef is so shallow that as the next wave of the set comes through it sucks the water off the reef leaving it dry. There is nothing else to do but try relax and let the wave pass over you.

ignoblis

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Tue Jul 15th, 2008 01:27 am
  PM Quote Reply
25th Post
t-time
Senior Member


Joined: Tue Apr 15th, 2008
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 629
Equipment: rolling with the times
Best Catch: still coming
Favorite Fishing Spot:  Cape Point,
Boat: Lee Cat 800. ''Devocean''
Club: nope
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
i agree with ignonlis, the less you fight the wave the better it is for you. i've been surfing for as long as i can remember and have some pretty serious wipeouts on some size waves, and like everyone has said never panic cos its only gonna make u do desperate things without thinking.
nice posts hendre
p.s try not to swim at koeel bay, people have died there and it has a serious rip and shallow closeouts

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Tue Jul 15th, 2008 01:27 am
  PM Quote Reply
26th Post
t-time
Senior Member


Joined: Tue Apr 15th, 2008
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 629
Equipment: rolling with the times
Best Catch: still coming
Favorite Fishing Spot:  Cape Point,
Boat: Lee Cat 800. ''Devocean''
Club: nope
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
i agree with ignonlis, the less you fight the wave the better it is for you. i've been surfing for as long as i can remember and have some pretty serious wipeouts on some size waves, and like everyone has said never panic cos its only gonna make u do desperate things without thinking.
nice posts hendre
p.s try not to swim at koeel bay, people have died there and it has a serious rip and shallow closeouts

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Wed Dec 17th, 2008 06:29 pm
  PM Quote Reply
27th Post
Tommiee
Member
 

Joined: Wed Dec 17th, 2008
Location: Franschhoek, South Africa
Posts: 1
Equipment: DIAWA AMBASSADOR
Best Catch: YELLOW FIN tUNA 50 KG
Favorite Fishing Spot: Wherever is sea water
Boat: Cobra Cat 500
Club: GBBAC
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
Hello Almal

Ek was  Saterdag 13.12.08 by Rooiels besig om kreef te trek en daar was nog een boot saam met my wat ek onbewustelik dop gehou het om te sien waar hulle hul kreef nette laat sak. Toe ek weer opkyk om te sien waar hulle is, sien ek net hulle boot hoog bo op 'n brander wat oor 'n blinder spoel en daar is niemand in die boot nie.

Ons was gelukkig genoeg om drie lewens te red te danke aan 'n duiker wat ook in die omgewing besig was om kreef te duik. Die water was twaalf grade en hulle was heeltemal uitgeput toe ons hulle almal aan boord gekry het. Die moeilikste was om hulle in die boot te kry ten spyte van die feit dat my  boot 'n trappie en 'n bankie tussen die twee enjins het. 

Die oorsaak van die ongeluk was dat hulle die kreef net se tou in altwee propellers gekry het en nie gou genoeg die tou kon los sny nie. Ek het ook afgelei uit 'n later gesprek dat die behalwe die skipper, die res van die bemanning onervare was en ek glo dit het bygedra tot die ongeluk. Die wind was redelik sterk en dit het die boot vinniger op die blinder gedryf as wat hulle besef het. Hulle reddings baadjies is saam  met die boot onder die water in nadat die branders die boot stukkend geslaan het op die rotse. Wat veronderstel was om 'n heerlike uitstappie te wees en my seun meer ervaring op die see te gee,  het toe in 'n behoorlike see les ontaard.

Ek wil net aansluit by die vorige skrywer oor sy goeie raad vir veiligheid en sĂȘ dat ons moet eerste aan ons veligheid dink en vooraf dink wat gaan jy doen in soortgelyke situasies. Is ons regtig voorberei om in so 'n situasie die regte besluite te neem?

Groete

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Fri Dec 26th, 2008 08:10 pm
  PM Quote Reply
28th Post
Wayne
Sealiner


Joined: Fri May 25th, 2007
Location: Jacobsbaai Weskus, South Africa
Posts: 2914
Equipment: Rods ,Reels,Line,Hooks and sinkers.....
Best Catch: All sorts of fish...
Favorite Fishing Spot: Any place I can cast a line.
Boat: The bath tub....
Club: Spioenkop Rock n Surf angling club Weskus
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
Great post buddy..just one thing I know for a fact...once you hit these waters of the West Coast,you best do those actions above quick,this water down here is ice cold... I fish with a wetsuit no matter where just in case somthing ike this does happen to be and God alone I sure pray it dont... keep the posts coming...

Back To Top PM Quote Reply


Current time is 01:06 am Page:  First Page Previous Page  1  2     
SEALINE - South African Angling and Boating Community > General Angling Topics > Sealine Medical Files > Dangerous Situations Top