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The travelling angler  Rating:  Rating
 
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 Posted: Tue Sep 18th, 2012 01:02 pm
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Fin-S
Sealiner
 

Joined: Mon Nov 26th, 2007
Location: Gordons Bay, Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 1491
Equipment: Tackle tart
Best Catch: Good fishing mates
Favorite Fishing Spot: Remote locations in Africa
Boat: StealthCat, 2 x Suzuki 4's
Club: IGFA
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Mana: 
Having seen many posts regarding the travelling angler, I thought I would try and shed some light on what works for me with regards to travel and tackle. Please note that I am by no means an expert but I do travel at least every alternate week and always have some kit with me. Also, whilst I have not been everywhere, I see Europe 3 times a year, USA and Aspac yearly and MEA every week.

I generally fly with our national airline and they have one of the best baggage policies around. Have a look at http://www.flysaa.com/za/en/flyingSAA/baggage/sportingEquipment.html
And you will see:
Special Baggage Charges - (for International and Domestic Journeys valid to both the Weight and Piece Concept)
Special Baggage Regulations are applicable on SA operating flights only. (SA 1000; 7000; 8000 series excluded)
The following Sport equipment mentioned below will allow an additional 20kg free of charge per passenger - this is valid to both the Weight and Piece Concept. Please note that this is not applicable to special events such as the Argus.
• Angling

This means that you are allowed an extra 20kgs of fishing tackle when on SAA flights – free. As long as it complies with the overall dimension and weight policy, and is not mixed with other luggage, then you can take it.
It is always worthwhile to investigate the luggage policy of the airline you are travelling on, and take a printout with you if necessary to combat the overzealous check in person.

Hand luggage (the stuff you carry on board) is generally limited to one piece, 8kgs, total dimensions of 115cm (L + W + D). On board staff are normally quite strict on this so be aware that anything extra may get put into the hold.

I guess there are 2 sorts of trips – the dedicated fishing trip and the trip where fishing is an add on.

The Dedicated Trip.
I am not going to go into species specific destinations as obviously a jigging trip to Latham will have very different gear to an Alaskan salmon trip. However, there are a few things to consider.
How to pack rods.
Basically there are three choices. The least expensive and DIY method involves PVC drain pipe cut to size. I use 4 inch diameter and buy 2 end caps. One is permanently sealed in place as the base; the other is the removable top which is taped into place when travelling. To avoid losing it when the tube is unpacked, I normally secure it with a cable tie. I have riveted a hasp onto the tube and use a combination lock to secure it. Stay away from keys as they are easily lost – my entire travel luggage has combination locks with the same combo, it is much easier to remember!

The second method is to use individual rod tubes that are often sold with the rod. These are great in that they are the correct size, quite strong and can be bundled together to make a substantial package. When it comes to securing them to each other, stay away from packaging tape – rather use a fabric tape combined with cable ties.

Attachment: Rod tubes.JPG (Downloaded 1511 times)

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 Posted: Tue Sep 18th, 2012 01:04 pm
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Fin-S
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Joined: Mon Nov 26th, 2007
Location: Gordons Bay, Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 1491
Equipment: Tackle tart
Best Catch: Good fishing mates
Favorite Fishing Spot: Remote locations in Africa
Boat: StealthCat, 2 x Suzuki 4's
Club: IGFA
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The final and most professional way is to use a purpose built rod holder. These are generally extendable, shatterproof, lockable and in some cases even have wheels. The Shimano rodcase is the business if you can afford one.

When you are packing the rods in any of the above tubes, stuff some socks or jocks in the tube first to act as a cushion against the base. Then wrap each rod section in a t-shirt or fishing shirt. Combine the sections (each individually wrapped) tip to butt and wrap the lot in a kikoi. This should fill all the empty space inside the tube, stop things rattling around and also mean there is less to pack in the main case.

With any rod, I have found the less overall packed length, the less damage is likely and as a result all travel rods I take are multi piece.
In all cases remember that airline handling personnel do not take great care with luggage. It therefore pays to mark them as Fragile – Handle with care. Also note that because they are oversize, rods will most often be delivered from the aircraft into another part of the baggage carousel area. Meaning you have to go and look for them. It pays to ask a member of staff where the outsize baggage comes out and hang around there to grab the rods before someone else does. Also, if the rods do not arrive, file your claim as soon as possible and insist on someone actually visiting the aircraft before it takes off again as rods have a habit of rolling to the back or side of the cargo area.

How to pack reels.
In short, very carefully. For spinning reels, fold away the handle or unscrew it. Put an elastic band around the spool to stop everything unraveling and wrap it in some spare clothes. For multipliers, put them into gear and wrap in long pants. Fly reels can be packed in socks and then squeezed inside shoes in the luggage. There is a lot of conjecture about braid. I have not been stopped yet although I have heard of over zealous officials in the Caribbean and Australia. I would recommend therefore that any reels with braid on, go into the checked in luggage, and not as carry on.

Terminal Tackle.
It is amazing how often you are on a trip and something small can make a difference. These include a couple of packs of yozuris / sabikis, small hooks to catch bait, some splitshot, a couple of small floats, a range of different size hooks including some large circles, wire trace (a pack of American piano wire takes up no space) and a pack of silver muppets / squid. In addition to this remember spare main line, spare braid, leader line, fluoro carbon, strong swivels, snap swivels, small ball sinkers, spinners, plugs, poppers etc. All of these can be put in small Plano style boxes. For the flyfisherman, apart from spare flyline, tapered leaders and flies, it is a good idea to take a small flytying kit. To cart your flyfishing gear around, and even a selection of terminal tackle and spinners, I have found a waist bag to be ideal.

Attachment: Belt Bag.JPG (Downloaded 1508 times)

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 Posted: Tue Sep 18th, 2012 01:05 pm
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Fin-S
Sealiner
 

Joined: Mon Nov 26th, 2007
Location: Gordons Bay, Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 1491
Equipment: Tackle tart
Best Catch: Good fishing mates
Favorite Fishing Spot: Remote locations in Africa
Boat: StealthCat, 2 x Suzuki 4's
Club: IGFA
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Accessories
Cable ties (can double for many purposes including reel grips), strong fabric tape, rubber bands, first aid kit, torch with spare batteries if required, sunglasses, camera and charger / batteries, wide brimmed hat, baseball cap, large handkerchief, leatherman (pack in main luggage as it won’t get past security), mozzie spray, suncream, lip ice, WD40, lightweight sungloves (or jigging gloves if required), toiletries (use biodegradable citronella soap if in the bush).
For the first aid kit, I take various sizes of plasters, antiseptic cream, sterile dressings, gauze bandage, broad spectrum antibiotic, paracetamol tablets, voltaren tablets, antihistamine tablets, sterile swabs, curved sewing needle and thread and a syringe with a sterile needle. It may seem overkill but in some areas it is better to treat yourself rather than rely upon a local clinic.

Clothing.
Don’t waste valuable weight by taking too many clothes. Travel in one set of longs, (long fishing pants, wading shoes / takkies, t-shirt, long shirt, raincoat. Pack one other pair of longs for evening, one other long sleeve shirt, 2 short sleeve fishing shirts (or longs if you value your skin), one pair of fishing shorts, one pair of baggies and a t shirt. Having had malaria I am quite careful about covering up at night and hence take socks as well. A few pairs of jocks and you are done. Apart from the shoes you are travelling in, a pair of boat shoes / deck shoes and slops should complete the kit.
Carry on bag.
As well as your travel documents, this should take your spare fishing kit, a change of clothes and your camera. A good idea is to use a day type rucksack as it can double up to use as your fishing bag. Make sure you buy one with a waterproof cover and a nice to have is a hydration bladder – particularly if you are doing long walks. This one suits the bill – A Meru 25.

Attachment: Meru 25.JPG (Downloaded 1506 times)

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 Posted: Tue Sep 18th, 2012 01:06 pm
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Fin-S
Sealiner
 

Joined: Mon Nov 26th, 2007
Location: Gordons Bay, Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 1491
Equipment: Tackle tart
Best Catch: Good fishing mates
Favorite Fishing Spot: Remote locations in Africa
Boat: StealthCat, 2 x Suzuki 4's
Club: IGFA
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Check in bag.
In most cases this needs to be a soft bag, particularly if you are on a charter flight. It should be on wheels, have strong handles, a strong shoulder strap and a waterproof section so that your wet gear does not soak everything else on the return flight. I use the large K-way bag from Cape Union Mart. A good tip here is to use the shoulder strap as a waist harness if you are desperate. Simply unclip from the bag, take onto the boat and clip into the reel lugs if you need help on a big fish.

Attachment: Main Bag.JPG (Downloaded 1504 times)

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 Posted: Tue Sep 18th, 2012 01:07 pm
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Fin-S
Sealiner
 

Joined: Mon Nov 26th, 2007
Location: Gordons Bay, Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 1491
Equipment: Tackle tart
Best Catch: Good fishing mates
Favorite Fishing Spot: Remote locations in Africa
Boat: StealthCat, 2 x Suzuki 4's
Club: IGFA
Status: 
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Spare kit.
This is probably the most critical stuff as it will be all you have if your main kit gets misplaced. I take 2 x 3 piece rods in a lightweight solid tube that comes onboard with me. One is a flyrod, (6 or 8 or 12 weight) and the other is a Temple Fork 7’ 6kg casting stick. One reel for each goes in the rucksack as well. I use the Exceller range as they seem reliable and have so far caught skippies, wahoo, Nile perch, yellowtail, salmon and plenty of kingies. Add to this one of the small Plano boxes with a minimal selection of end tackle and lures and at least you have something to use.


Hopefully that is a start!

Attachment: Travel rods.JPG (Downloaded 1504 times)

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 Posted: Tue Sep 18th, 2012 01:08 pm
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M@rius
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Joined: Fri Oct 10th, 2008
Location: Amsterdam, Netherlands
Posts: 420
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Very informative post, thanks!

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 Posted: Tue Sep 18th, 2012 03:23 pm
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benniejordaan
Offshore Moderator


Joined: Wed Nov 14th, 2007
Location: Durban, South Africa
Posts: 12407
Equipment: A few bits and pieces, nothing special.
Best Catch: Marlin
Favorite Fishing Spot: East coast
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Seriously brilliant post, thank you! I'm sure this will come in very handy!

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 Posted: Sat Sep 22nd, 2012 08:58 am
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benniejordaan
Offshore Moderator


Joined: Wed Nov 14th, 2007
Location: Durban, South Africa
Posts: 12407
Equipment: A few bits and pieces, nothing special.
Best Catch: Marlin
Favorite Fishing Spot: East coast
Boat: Seacat 520
Club: Fynnlands
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Mana: 
Made a sticky. This is good info... Thanks FinS

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 Posted: Sat Sep 22nd, 2012 03:36 pm
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DeWaLdMeYeR1
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Joined: Thu Apr 14th, 2011
Location: Jeffreys Bay, South Africa
Posts: 481
Equipment: proudly shimano, torium, TLD, exage, vengeance, beastmaster jboat, special tiger
Best Catch: 12kg yellowtail, 18kg kob, 9kg belman, 9lb tigerfish, 84kg raggie, ...
Favorite Fishing Spot: 12kg yellowtail, 18kg kob, 9kg belman, 9lb tigerfish, 84kg raggie, ...eastern cape, kabeljous & st francis. krom river. cape agulhas. ...
Boat: custom build 20ft cat cabin boat. still in progress
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Mana: 
friends of mine got hassled by air port security about their flylines on their way to mexico! Just thought this might fit on topic! Great post!

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 Posted: Wed Oct 24th, 2012 09:36 am
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Patrick
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Joined: Wed Oct 25th, 2006
Location: Cape Town
Posts: 2579
Equipment: Spinning/Jigging stuff
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Awesome post Tim! We're about to head off to Nyati next month and there's been lots of discussion about what to pack, where and how. This post sure will come in handy. Cheers

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 Posted: Sat May 27th, 2017 11:24 pm
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delpy8
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Joined: Sun Apr 9th, 2017
Location: JOHNSTONE, United Kingdom
Posts: 9
Equipment: Imax Ocean Scout 11.6 & Shimano Exage BX STC 10FT
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Great post thank you, have any of you used Emirates from Durban and what's their take on rods and stuff

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 Posted: Mon May 29th, 2017 10:47 am
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Fin-S
Sealiner
 

Joined: Mon Nov 26th, 2007
Location: Gordons Bay, Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 1491
Equipment: Tackle tart
Best Catch: Good fishing mates
Favorite Fishing Spot: Remote locations in Africa
Boat: StealthCat, 2 x Suzuki 4's
Club: IGFA
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
EK can be very strict with max dimension rule. As long as you are within the limit, then you can check in your rods. But, you will be charged extra. Be aware that different rules apply depending on final destination.

In general for flights leaving Africa (and assuming you are not Gold / Plat status and are flying economy) then you get 2 pieces free of charge up to 23kgs each and with max combined dimensions of 150cm each.
If you exceed the 150cm, then the charge will be USD250.

If your rods exceed 300cm, they will not be allowed on the flight and will need to be booked cargo.

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