SEALINE - South African Angling and Boating Community Home 
Home Recent Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register


 Moderated by: Emperor
New Topic Reply Printer Friendly
help sliding  Rate Topic 
 
AuthorPost
 Posted: Mon Oct 18th, 2010 11:06 am
  PM Quote Reply
1st Post
Suspect
Member


Joined: Mon May 18th, 2009
Location: Vanguard Drive Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 247
Equipment: ...........
Best Catch: ..........
Favorite Fishing Spot: ...........
Boat: ..........
Club: ..........
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
How does one know when the bait has reached the ring. I stay getting burnt off please help

Thanks in advance

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Thu Feb 17th, 2011 11:28 am
  PM Quote Reply
2nd Post
Dean Slater
Senior Member


Joined: Wed Jun 2nd, 2010
Location: Boksburg, South Africa
Posts: 652
Equipment: Assasin ,Shimano torium, Penn powerstick pro, Diawa SL50 SH, Assasin ...
Best Catch: caught driving 110 in a 60 zone.
Favorite Fishing Spot: Orange rocks South coast
Boat: in the proccess of stealing one.
Club: I prefer a crowbar, better weight.
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
dont strike when you get the pull, rather reel in line until your slide hits the ring, yul feel it get really heavy, then strike, iv seen tons of people strike as soon as they get pulled only to find that they get burnt off, because the slide is still on thier main line.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Thu Feb 17th, 2011 11:45 am
  PM Quote Reply
3rd Post
Simen
Administrator


Joined: Wed Jun 13th, 2007
Location: Swakopmund, Namibia
Posts: 7325
Equipment: shimano/daiwa reels - blue marlin/ shimano/Waft rods
Best Catch: 120kg bronze whaler 27 kg cob 17kg kingfish, 13kg ...
Favorite Fishing Spot: Namibie--Winston,Mile 98, Arrarat, Blare.
Boat: none
Club: Henties Baai
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
My Gallery: 
Dean Slater wrote: dont strike when you get the pull, rather reel in line until your slide hits the ring, yul feel it get really heavy, then strike, iv seen tons of people strike as soon as they get pulled only to find that they get burnt off, because the slide is still on thier main line.

Either the above or, thumb your spool when you get a run (dont lock the drag) -- press down on the spool with your thumb, so forcing the pickup to either swim towards the ring, or make the ring come towards the pick-up.

You will know when the slide is at the ring, then go through the striking motions and set the drag for the fight.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Thu Feb 17th, 2011 12:32 pm
  PM Quote Reply
4th Post
Trophy
Sealine Expert - Rock and Surf


Joined: Fri May 16th, 2008
Location: Port Elizabeth, South Africa
Posts: 7645
Equipment: Sponsored by Trophy Tackle Den & Awa Shima
Best Catch: 41.5Kg Cob, 290Kg Raggie, 138Kg Cow, 150Kg Bronzie(M), 160 Black ...
Favorite Fishing Spot: St Francis
Boat: 5.5m Viking Cabin, 75 Mercury
Club: Oh Please...RASSPL
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
Hiya Suspect,

Burn-off will always happen, but the better you get at sliding the less you will encounter.

It's a fact that far more often than we like to believe the slide never reaches the stopper...especially when fishing off flat beaches. On deep water points the gradient down to the stopper does provide additional assistance.

To prevent a burn-off these are the areas that count the most...

You must shake that bait down till you feel your arms may drop off...and then shake some more. Try different rod stroke patterns over the entire time that you are busy. I combine a number of different stroke actions from short quick stabs to long slow strokes through a 90 degree action.

Once your arms have fallen off and the rod is either in you hands or pension pipe matching the reels drag setting to the sea currents is VITAL. Here two factors play a role.

The first is that heavy grab sinker at the end of your line! Remember how hard you have to pull on your setup to get that sinker loose? Well thats just as hard as the running fish has to pull...except here the benefit of 100m of nylon stretch does not allow that 'shock relief'.

The second factor is the current in the water acting out on thick 0.50 - 0.55 mono. Currents will always cause a bow in the line and if you have not managed to get your slide all the way down the slide will sit in this bow and in some cases move up the line and into the bow...a slide CAN move backwards.

Now back to drag setting...a shark will not always swim away from you? It's prob accurate to say they hardly ever do maybe 1/10 times this can happen. The other 9/10 times they can head off in any direction. If there is a strong wash you can bet your bottom dollar that they will take full advantage of the moving water before or once hooked.

Thinking back to your firmly wedged sinker, a slide bait 5m from your leader, washing current and a slight bow in your line and a fish that decides to take off at a 45 degree run to the beach. Add a to loose drag setting to the mix and all that will happen is that your sinker remains where it was, your bow is made larger by the line coming off the reel and the chances for a burn-off greater.

I get around these conditions by keeping a tight drag which helps direct the fish back in the direction of the sinker. I may lift the rod, but only strike and set the hooks once I can feel the sinker has lifted and the dead weight of the fish is against the stopper.

If I get a few burn off's in a row then I drop the connection between the sinker and stopper ring as light as possible...0.40 at times. Would rather loose a sinker that a slide rig and FISH!

You have to combine simple logic and a small change here or there...or a combination of some of the factors I have mentioned to reduce your burn off count.

Please chaps...don't set your drags tight and then wonder off or catch a zizzz only to find a broken rod butt in the stand or drag marks to the beach indicating the last direction of your rod into the drink.

My last advice is try to imagine what's happening under the water...what factors are playing out and then act accordingly or different to prevent burn offs from happening.

 

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Thu Feb 17th, 2011 02:35 pm
  PM Quote Reply
5th Post
Moyeni
Sealiner


Joined: Sat Jan 2nd, 2010
Location: Durban, South Africa
Posts: 1153
Equipment: HMG 400-7+1 / BM Bronzie / Sierra / Dogfight LD60 ...
Best Catch: Sardine Season '07
Favorite Fishing Spot: Cape Vidal (The Ledges),Tesingane Point (Sezela),Brighton Beach (DBN)
Boat: Cuta Copter - REVO 3 & 4
Club: Fynnlands Angling Club
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
Also remember the further you cast the LONGER you must shake.

I normally shake for about 10min if I cast my full distance.

I have also learn't not to shake when a BIG FOAMY comes pass my bait,drop your rod horizontal,wait for it to pass then begin to slide again.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  

 Posted: Thu Feb 17th, 2011 07:15 pm
  PM Quote Reply
6th Post
Aiden
Senior Member


Joined: Tue Sep 9th, 2008
Location: Brackenfell, Cape Town, South Africa
Posts: 241
Equipment: Blue Marlin & Purglas rods, Daiwa, Shimano,Okuma & Penn reels, ...
Best Catch: 18kg kabeljou, Gordonsbay
Favorite Fishing Spot: Struisbaai, Macassar, Hangklip
Boat: pending
Club: TRS
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
My Gallery: 
Simen wrote: Dean Slater wrote: dont strike when you get the pull, rather reel in line until your slide hits the ring, yul feel it get really heavy, then strike, iv seen tons of people strike as soon as they get pulled only to find that they get burnt off, because the slide is still on thier main line.

Either the above or, thumb your spool when you get a run (dont lock the drag) -- press down on the spool with your thumb, so forcing the pickup to either swim towards the ring, or make the ring come towards the pick-up.

You will know when the slide is at the ring, then go through the striking motions and set the drag for the fight.
I lost 10 fish before using this technique, and then I landed my first bronzie, so this is true!! Id also like to add, when possible, get to higher grounds after your slide is in the water and shake from there. The angle will get your slide in quicker.

Last edited on Thu Feb 17th, 2011 07:16 pm by Aiden

Back To Top PM Quote Reply

 Posted: Fri Feb 18th, 2011 06:26 am
  PM Quote Reply
7th Post
Dean Slater
Senior Member


Joined: Wed Jun 2nd, 2010
Location: Boksburg, South Africa
Posts: 652
Equipment: Assasin ,Shimano torium, Penn powerstick pro, Diawa SL50 SH, Assasin ...
Best Catch: caught driving 110 in a 60 zone.
Favorite Fishing Spot: Orange rocks South coast
Boat: in the proccess of stealing one.
Club: I prefer a crowbar, better weight.
Status: 
Offline
Mana: 
Aiden wrote: Simen wrote: Dean Slater wrote: dont strike when you get the pull, rather reel in line until your slide hits the ring, yul feel it get really heavy, then strike, iv seen tons of people strike as soon as they get pulled only to find that they get burnt off, because the slide is still on thier main line.

Either the above or, thumb your spool when you get a run (dont lock the drag) -- press down on the spool with your thumb, so forcing the pickup to either swim towards the ring, or make the ring come towards the pick-up.

You will know when the slide is at the ring, then go through the striking motions and set the drag for the fight.
I lost 10 fish before using this technique, and then I landed my first bronzie, so this is true!! Id also like to add, when possible, get to higher grounds after your slide is in the water and shake from there. The angle will get your slide in quicker.

its such a common mistake.... many fish lost to this burn off, people see/feel the pull and instinct takes over and they start striking like mad, burning themselves off.

Back To Top PM Quote Reply  


Current time is 01:36 am  
SEALINE - South African Angling and Boating Community > General Angling Topics > Sealine - F.A.Q's and Articles > Sliding > help sliding Top