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SLIDING and the Non-Return Slide  Rating:  Rating
 
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 Posted: Thu Jul 9th, 2009 02:55 pm $report_button
   
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Trophy
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Non-Return Slide Fishing

Concept

The non-return slide has been around angling for about ten years now and has become very entrenched into the South African angling circles. The method is commonly know as ‘sliding’ and is predominantly used to target non-edible fish species such as sharks, rays and skates. Saying this there is also a large number of anglers that use slides to great effect to target Kob and Garrick on live baits. Over the years there have been many outstanding edibles caught on slide rigs making its versatility limitless.

The concept is simple. The method allows you to place very large baits with almost pin point accuracy at distanced you could never dream of attaining with much smaller throw baits. The style is unique to South African angling and although it has been taken to/from various countries the successes have been limited. Sliding is a robust form of fishing and the typical tackle and equipment used by South African anglers is well suited and complements the requirements.
 

Rig & Materials

Slides

Slides come in all shapes, sizes and materials these days and the beginner can easily be fooled into buying items of poor quality only to have the item fail when it counted the most. Be wary of cheap and nasty, have a look to see what styles experienced slide fishermen are using before making a purchase. Quality slides are made from spring or stainless steel rods. If you can easily bend the shaft by hand then just imagine what pressure a decent shark can inflict during a lengthy battle. Most of the pressure will be transferred onto the coil section by the stopper ring, this is where you want to see 4- 7 smaller tightly twisted coils as a measure of quality. Inspect the size as well as the weld joins on the stopper ring. Make sure the stopper ring is the correct size and would not easily be pulled back into the coil under pressure.

On the shaft, where the swivel is joined, I prefer the non welded type. The swivel should be a decent sized and preferably a power type swivel as opposed to a barrel swivel. Some new developments have a plastic bead inserted on the straight bar of the coil, this further prevents the coil from compressing and stops the stopper ring being pulled though the coils. 
 
Most slides fail either when the swivel snaps or the weld used to secure a swivel fails. In most cases this is caused by inferior material or poor construction. It can also happen if a slide rig has been used a number of times without being washed in fresh water. Salt residue will erode both the weld and the internal clasps of the swivel resulting in a tackle failure.



A good tip, after fishing a rig, is to wash your rigs in fresh water, let them dry and then spray your non-return slide and rig with WD-40. This will limit the amount of corrosion cause by salt water when stored.

Light Slides are made from mild steel wire and are intended for every day use in places that are not renowned big shark waters. The springs are smaller with less 'turns'. The swivels used are smaller and not genuine power swivels. These slides are mass produced and purchased in packs of two or three.



Medium Slides are made from thicker gauge mild steel or thin gauge stainless steel. The springs are larger with more 'turns' to ensure a strong stopper. These slide are hand made and not mass produced. They have larger power swivels and are sold individually.



Heavy slides are made of thick gauge stainless steel. The springs are reinforced with a plastic bead on the base. This prevents the spring from collapsing under extreme pressures. Large power swivels and solid brass welds ensure strength. These slides are handmade and sold individually at specialist shops.



Hooks

What hooks an angler uses on his slide rigs can be a very hot and touchy topic. Countless war stories can be told and a variety of reasons told why one hook is better than the next. The one sure thing that any shark angler must be certain of is that they always use the best quality hook they can afford. Sizes again differ from angler to angler and the particular brand they use. I would suggest the smallest size used is a 10/0 in ‘J’ hooks and an 11/0 in circle hooks. These will cater for just about every bait size. If you are really sending out much larger baits then match the hook to the bait.

‘J’ Hooks are still the most popular to be used on slide rigs. The three most popular brands would be Diiach, Mustad and Kendal. Although ‘J’ hooks have proven their effectiveness, they are often too effective and by the nature of their setting can hook into any part of the sharks mouth, throat, gills or stomach.



In recent years the attention to ensuring sustainable resources has given light to the circle hook. The circle hooks origins date back to the patterns of hooks used by our primitive forefathers. The commercial long liners have used circle hooks for years as an effective ‘self trapping’ hook means. What makes the circle so attractive to recreational and sports fishing is its deadly percentage of bite to hook-up ratio as well as its 99% assurance of setting itself into the scissors (corner) of any fish’s mouth. A good understanding of the mechanics and actions of circle hooks is a definite requirement. Getting use to fishing with circle hooks takes some practise at the water, but once you understand the dynamics you will wonder how you ever doubted that strange looking hook in the past.



 

Steel

There are only really two choices when selecting the steel for your rigs, solid wire (American Fishing wire / Piano wire) or woven or stranded wire. The latter is normally coated with a layer of carbon or plastic shrink. There are a good number of brands on the market, most are a good quality. Recently I have seen a few cheaper brands in tackle stores, but these are mainly in the lower breaking strains, all well below the 100lbs class.



 

As sliding has become more advanced anglers have quickly learnt the best spots and conditions that provide the BIG fish. There was a time when anglers considered 150Lbs steel sufficient to tackle ‘all’ catches. Today I would recommend a minimum of 200lbs steel as a failsafe against most possibilities. Saying this I have personally been bitten off twice and have witnessed at least three other instances where 200lbs steel has been clipped neater than a side cutter could finish the job. Your choice of steel thickness depends largely on the location and the species you are likely to target in these waters.

Many of South Africa’s top competitive and recreational anglers believe in using thinner diameter steel (150lbs max). The belief is that the thicker diameter steel is less likely to slip between the gaps of a sharks teeth and therefore enabling the base of two teeth to wear away during a prolonged fight or vicious strike. Personally I simply feel a lot more confident with the heavier gauge steel.

When targeting species such as Cow Sharks and Ragged Tooth Sharks, to improve the hook up rate, many anglers strip away the coating of the stranded steel. There is a belief that this coating often gets caught up in the shark’s teeth and therefore prevents the hook/s from setting in the jaw. 

Sinkers

Using the correct weight and grapnel sinker is crucial to completing a successful slide. The grapnel sinkers used for sliding differ from the common types used for most edible fishing. The most obvious difference is the extra long steel pins. These are used to really dig into the surface and provide an essential anchor to keep the line as tight as possible during the slide process.


Slide sinkers can be modified by simply bending the steel and making shapes that would then provide better grip for the angler. Below are the three configurations I like to use when using the non-return clip.

Standard Sinker used when fishing onto a firm sandy or scattered rocky ground. This STD configuration will provide enough grip, under normal swell and current conditions, to slide baits of up to 1-1.5Kg.

 

Modified like this a slide sinker will offer increased grip over the STD configuration. It can be used on firm sandy or scattered rocky ground, especially when there is increased swell and current at play. The modification can also be used to anchor the slide when using larger baits of 1.5kg or larger.

 

Modified like this a slide sinker will offer exceptional grip over very loose or shifting sandy sea beds or scattered rocky ground. It can also be used in conditions where there are larger swells and very strong currents.

 

Many anglers complain that they loose too many slide sinkers and often the entire slide when fishing with the non-return clips. To prevent your sinker being the cause of much frustration and costs I have added some basic points to help prevent common problems.

Sinkers monofilament snoot should never be longer than 30 – 45 cm and made from a lighter line mono your main line (main line 0.55mm then sinker snoot 0.40mm) The shorter sinker snoot prevents any chance of the sinker getting snagged or twisting up the main line during a prolonged fight. The lighter line ensures that if truly stuck the short lighter line will snap long before the main line. This will either save you a fish or a slid trace when rebating. 

When casting hook the stopper ring of the slide into the sinker clip, this will carry the weight and prevent the lighter sinker snoot from snapping under the pressure of the cast. In most cases the stopper ring will unclip once the sinker hits the bottom. To ensure the ring releases you can give the rod a few dips and jerks before the sinker settles on the seabed.

 

Generally slide sinkers do not get stuck, but are covered by sand. Remember that your baits are laying much longer than conventional fishing rigs, during this extended time the ocean tides and currents will deposit sand both over the sinker, rig and mainline. Many anglers become frustrated and impatient when trying to retrieve a ‘stuck’ slide trace and eventually end up snapping the main line and loosing an entire rig. This often ends up costing more than the slide rig as the line can snap anywhere between the rod tip and the rig! A good way to get your slide sinkers ‘unstuck’ is to apply maximum steady pressure and simply hold it there until the weight of the line tension lifts the sinker from the sand. Exercise patience, the process can take a few minutes. Try to avoid any shark jerks and pulls on the line, but rather slowly lift and drop the rod. Try it it works and you will save money once you have grasped the idea.

Where to Slide

Reading the water is the key to any successful fishing. To get a few pointers on how things operate under the water, then read this article which provides an overview of tides and water features. http://nutshelltravel.com/NutShell%20Fishing/New%20Template/content_temp/Articles/article_beach_fishing_101/article_beach_fishing_101.htm

If you decide to fish a unknown spot then try to locate deeper water coming off a gulley, bank, rip bank or rock feature. Sharks generally operate in the deeper water coming off these features. Under the right conditions they will venture onto or over banks to get to these spots where their food sources are found,

For the beginner it would be easier at first to practise your skills at a recognised shark fishing spot and then later venture out to new waters armed with some experience. 

 How to slide

Cast you sinker out reaching the most favourable spot you can reach and let it sink and gain a good grip on the seabed. Ensure that after your cast you have collected all the slack line from the bow of the cast and try to keep the line down to the sinker as tight and direct as possible. Let the sinker lie for a few minutes before you start attaching the slide rig to the line.


Attaching the slide spring:

Pic 001





Pic 002

 

Pic 003

 

Pic 004

 

Pic 005

 

Pic 006

 

Pic 007

 

Once you have the slide attached to the main line its time to send the bait down through the shore break and eventually onto the stopper ring. Getting the bait through the shore break can be tricky, especially during a strong pushing tide.

Get yourself as deep into the water as possible if fishing off the beach, if fishing of the rocks, find the highest ground and release the bait from here.

Keeping the main line as tight as possible, with your rod pointing upward, release the bait and let it slide down as far as possible in to the water. Once it touches down into the water you can immediately start making very small stabbing jerks on your rod. Some chaps almost like to cause a vibration down the line during the initial slide by completing very short fast jabs. Remember to time your actions with the shore break waves. Try stopping and lifting your rod as a strong wave crashes over the bait. Once the baits has cleared the initial shore break you can lengthen your rod strokes into a constant pumping action. Always on a tight line and keeping an eye on the slide progress of your bait. Try to get into a motion by watching what action with your rod jerks produces the best slide action to your bait.

Once out of sight with your bait well under the water keep pumping your rod and shaking the bait for at least another 5 – 7 minutes to ensure the bait reaches the stopper ring. A bait suspended somewhere between the rod tip and stopper will the best of times result in a burn off when the strike comes.

Baits

A simple rule of thumb says that the bigger the bait the bigger the fish! Use you imagination and run wild. Try to carry at least three different bait types with you when shark fishing. Believe it or not these guys can get picky. The three bait types I loosely class as white meat, red meat and snot baits.

 







White Meat Baits: Yellow Tail, Shad, Mullet, Grunter

Red Meat Baits: Mackerel, Horse Mackerel, Bonito’s

Snot Baits: Chokka Tubes, Whole Octopus, Shark Flake / Heads, Skate / Ray wings  

Strike

A shark strike can vary every single take and are never the same. On slide the most important thing to consider is whether your spring has reached the stopper ring before you start applying the fight pressure.

When I get a take I generally wait for the fish to pull the rod down and start taking line before I tighten up and wait for the definite solid feel of the stopper ring. Once I’m certain that slide is in place I set the hooks by simply lifting the rod two or three times…no violent strike is needed. Remember that if you are using circles hooks no strike at all is required. 

When you initially start using the non-return clip there will be fish lost through ‘burn off’s’ and it will take a while to get to grips with the concept. Once you have perfected the strike, the fight is like any other.

Nothing substitutes for time spent by the water, but instead of spending ten visits doing the same thing have one day of trying ten different things.

 

Tight Lines,

Trophy (aka Brett Harris)

Last edited on Thu Jul 9th, 2009 03:14 pm by Trophy

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 Posted: Thu Jul 9th, 2009 02:58 pm $report_button
   
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misguide
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Nice post Brett!

:first

Last edited on Thu Jul 9th, 2009 02:59 pm by misguide

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 Posted: Thu Jul 9th, 2009 03:06 pm $report_button
   
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Yman
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brilliant post.

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 Posted: Thu Jul 9th, 2009 03:22 pm $report_button
   
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Kumz
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Excellent stuff Trophy !!!

Thanks !!!

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 Posted: Thu Jul 9th, 2009 03:27 pm $report_button
   
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HEIHACHI
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well done trophy!
very informative

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 Posted: Thu Jul 9th, 2009 03:48 pm $report_button
   
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gogo
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Great post Trophy!

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 Posted: Thu Jul 9th, 2009 03:55 pm $report_button
   
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camo shorts
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Nice Trophy, thanks, am getting more confident reading your posts, so gonna try sliding soon

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 Posted: Thu Jul 9th, 2009 04:14 pm $report_button
   
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Enigma
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Hiya Trophy

Great post. One thing that many people are not discussing on the forum though are the live bait clips and rigging baits on them.

Maybe you can add this to your repertoire. It's used with great success on the KZN coast, especially when the Garrick/Leeries are on the bite. Allows the bait free movement from the point where the line enters the water all the way to the stop ring and it doesn't cause burn-offs

I also saw some mini slides probably 1/2 to 1/3 the size of the standard slide and the guys use it on lighter tackle to slide baits for edibles or put out small live baits.

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 Posted: Thu Jul 9th, 2009 04:24 pm $report_button
   
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Great Stuff Brett !
:clap12:clap12:clap12

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 Posted: Thu Jul 9th, 2009 04:27 pm $report_button
   
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not bad Mr Harris

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 Posted: Thu Jul 9th, 2009 04:45 pm $report_button
   
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Brilliant post Brett. :beer

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 Posted: Thu Jul 9th, 2009 04:53 pm $report_button
   
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Trophy
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Enigma wrote: Hiya Trophy

Great post. One thing that many people are not discussing on the forum though are the live bait clips and rigging baits on them.

Maybe you can add this to your repertoire. It's used with great success on the KZN coast, especially when the Garrick/Leeries are on the bite. Allows the bait free movement from the point where the line enters the water all the way to the stop ring and it doesn't cause burn-offs

I also saw some mini slides probably 1/2 to 1/3 the size of the standard slide and the guys use it on lighter tackle to slide baits for edibles or put out small live baits.


Hiya Enigma,

I have posted these smaller slides a few times on the forum. The guys use this rig, baited with Gorries and Mullet to nail the Garrick of the Brighton Pier in the Summer months.

I'm going to be switching the 2xtrebles to 1xCircle hook this Summer round! Watch this space.

Attachment: DSCF5283.JPG (Downloaded 5427 times)

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 Posted: Thu Jul 9th, 2009 04:57 pm $report_button
   
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Enigma
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Have you tried the livebait clips?  These are killers for fishing live baits, especially for Garrick

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 Posted: Thu Jul 9th, 2009 05:06 pm $report_button
   
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Trophy
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These ones?

I have not used these for ages. In CT many moons ago I use to use them in Die Dam at Langebaan and of the various CT harbour walls. Great fun catching Leeries.

Attachment: Live Bait Clip 01.jpg (Downloaded 5435 times)

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 Posted: Thu Jul 9th, 2009 05:09 pm $report_button
   
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Mike Pike
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Good post Brett lots of valuable info and tips .Thanks

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 Posted: Thu Jul 9th, 2009 05:17 pm $report_button
   
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ants
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Thank you Trophy. Excellent post!

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 Posted: Thu Jul 9th, 2009 10:28 pm $report_button
   
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thebigman
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Nice one Trophy, have posted a link to here from that UK forum.

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 Posted: Fri Jul 10th, 2009 07:12 am $report_button
   
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Enigma
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Trophy, yes those clips.

Deadly for livebait fishing as the bait can swim from the surf zone all the way to where your lead is anchored, although shaking the line does send it out a bit further.

As it doesn't burn the line off you can use lighter tackle and target finicky feeders like the Garrick.  With the way the rig works it's almost like fishing a drift line because the whole rig moves freely both ways on the line.

Striking the fish on differs with this trace, it's a matter of reeling the line in till the stop ring makes contact with the slide and then lift, put pressure to the fish and the fight's on.

I struggled in the begining with rigging the livebaits and getting them out through the surf line but learnt a few tricks from the South Coast Garrick fishemen,  like snipping the tail, snip the top fin to case the bait to keep swimming upward for Garrick and snipping the bottom fin to keep it swimming down and more to the weight to keep the bait deep for deeper feeders like Kob.

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 Posted: Fri Jul 10th, 2009 07:49 am $report_button
   
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OFC
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as always a magic post !!! thanx Brett !!! :clap12:clap12:clap12

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 Posted: Fri Jul 10th, 2009 08:18 am $report_button
   
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Mike Pike
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Trophy wrote: These ones?

I have not used these for ages. In CT many moons ago I use to use them in Die Dam at Langebaan and of the various CT harbour walls. Great fun catching Leeries.

One question, would the other half of the trace be made up as per the usual sliding trace eg: leader to steel trace and onto stopper ring , or would you go straight leader onto stopper ring... thx. Mike  

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